How to Know When It’s Time for a Bigger House

Knowing when to “upgrade” is half the battle in real estate. Over the last few years there’s been a lot of talk about downsizing and living smaller but the fact is, some growing families need more space, not less. The move-up buyer is one of the demographics spurning the real estate market comeback…home prices are currently at 2002/2003 levels but increasing every day. If you’ve been waiting out the market, now’s the perfect time to buy a larger home.

The average first home is around 1,500 square feet and most first-time buyers have a family size of about 2.7 people. Second homes, however, average 2,000+ square feet and are getting larger. Did you know that in 2010, the median size for a new-construction home in the US was almost 2,400 square feet?

So, how do you know when your family is ready for a bigger house? Here are a few signs the On the Move Charlotte team has noticed usually mean it’s time to “move up.”

Your Family is Growing

The number one reason people decide to buy a larger home is an increase in family size. Many people buy their first home before they have children and only realize they need more space once more kids come into the picture. Children aren’t the only way families grow, either. From a new pet to a live-in parent, families expand in all sorts of ways which means a need for more bedrooms, bathrooms, and even parking spaces.

You Want Your Amenities In-House

As cities spread out, more and more families find themselves choosing suburban life over urban dwelling. Larger homes slightly further out from retail and restaurants encourage homeowners to install much of what they need inside their houses. Home gyms are increasingly popular as are gourmet-style kitchens. Why join a neighborhood swim club when you can upgrade to a house that already has a pool in the backyard?

Your Needs Have Changed

Large homes simply aren’t appropriate for every stage of life. A single 27-year old man in Charlotte likely needs less space but more walkability, but his needs may change when he’s 35, married, and has two kids. Perhaps you’ve started an at-home business and you need an extra bedroom to use as an office. Maybe your kids are of an age where you’d like a finished basement for them to spread out. Whatever the case, shifting priorities are a fact of life and they’re often the motivating factor for a move up buyer.

You’ve Recouped Your Equity

If you purchased your current home before the real estate downturn five years ago you’ve likely been waiting to sell until the timing’s right. Well, the timing’s right. Mortgage rates are hitting record lows (some hovering around 2.5%) and in many parts of the country the “seller’s market” is back. The best time to buy a bigger home is when you can sell your current place for close to if not more than you bought it for and upgrade before prices begin to skyrocket. Many Charlotte neighborhoods are experiencing exactly these conditions making 2013 one of the best times to buy a bigger home in years.

You Can Afford It

If Americans learned anything from the real estate crisis of 2008, it’s never to buy a home they can’t afford. Before you know if you’re ready for a bigger home, spend some time researching mortgage rates and talk to a financial adviser to find out if taking on more debt is in your best interest. Real estate is and always has been a solid long-term financial investment and buying a bigger home when your family needs one can often be a savvy money move. If you determine you can comfortably afford the payment, manage the increased utility expenses, and furnish a larger house, you may be ready to upgrade.

 

Call the brokers at On the Move Charlotte today to talk about whether or not it’s time for your family to begin looking for a larger house. Buying a bigger home is an important decision, but one that most families find necessary and even rewarding at some point during home ownership. Leigh Bryant, John Elliott, and Michelle Duyck will work with you to find the best home for your current needs.

704.516.3318

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *